News

PhD Studentship, Law, University of Nottingham

A fully funded studentship, within the School of Law at the University of Nottingham, is soon to be launched through the Rising from the Depths Network. Please check back here for more information.

Society and the Sea Conference, Greenwich University

Society and the Sea 2018; Investinblue conference: The values of the Ocean and Coasts for Sustainable Development” organised by the Greenwich Maritime Centre and National Maritime.

6th -7th September, Old Royal Naval College, Greenwich.

This international conference will bring together industry and academia to explore the value of the ocean and coasts, key challenges being faced and opportunities for future development of the blue economy. There will be over 100 presentations, 6 stages, conference dinner on board the Cutty Sark and the launch of the new Marine Social Sciences Network.

Conference Themes and Sessions include: Maritime Infrastructure & Industry; Maritime History & Heritage; Conservation & Engagement; Small-Scale Fisheries; Blue Economy; Maritime Human Health & Wellbeing; Maritime Governance; Ocean Literacy; Making Socio-Cultural Values Count; Scuppering Invisibility; Creating Places to Belong; Art, Social Impact & Reinvention; and International Coastal Communities.

Visit the conference website for more information, the draft programme and to register:  http://www.gre.ac.uk/society-and-the-sea

PhD Studentship, University of Nottingham

3-Year Faculty of Arts and Research Board PhD Studentship, Department of Classics and Archaeology, University of Nottingham, in connection with: ‘Rising from the Depths:

Applications are invited for a Faculty of Arts funded International PhD studentship granted in connection to a recent GCRF/AHRC-funded research project, Rising from the Depths Network: utilising marine cultural heritage in East Africa to help develop sustainable social, economic and cultural benefits.  Applicants for the studentship must be nationals of Kenya, Mozambique, Tanzania or Madagascar – countries which are the focus of the project.

The Rising from the Depths project aims to identify ways in which marine cultural heritage can directly benefit coastal communities in Kenya, Tanzania, Mozambique and Madagascar. Information about the project can be found on our website.

The successful candidate will be given some latitude as to the scope and approach of their doctorate, but the subject matter should be related to coastal and/or marine archaeology in one or a combination of the countries which are the focus of the project – Kenya, Mozambique, Tanzania or Madagascar. The proposed topic should consider an aspect of Marine Cultural Heritage and express how the research could help create wider benefits for local communities. For a fuller definition or Marine Cultural Heritage see our website.

The studentships will be based at the University of Nottingham (there is no provision for distance-learning PhDs) with a period, or periods, of research in the proposed study location if required. This studentship is available for 3 years full-time study (subject to satisfactory progression each year) and will be supervised by Dr Jon Henderson (Archaeology) and another academic selected dependent on the details of the chosen proposal. It will cover overseas tuition fees and provide an annual maintenance grant (stipend) matching Research Councils UK recommendation – for 2017/18 £14,777 per annum, pro rata.

Applicants should have a degree in a relevant discipline and a Masters-level degree MA (at distinction or merit) in Archaeology or a related discipline, ideally with some research focus on marine archaeology or history. Preference will be given to applicants with a demonstrable knowledge and interest in East African coastal and/or marine archaeology.

The call for applications will close on 20th September 2018 and we hope to interview (skype and video conferencing available) short-listed candidates shortly afterwards. Successful applicants will be expected to start the PhD programme in January 2019.

The University of Nottingham’s Graduate School’s Research Training Programme offers a broad and comprehensive range of research training courses from ‘Using Archives in Your Research’, to ‘Pathways into Publishing’. The Graduate School also runs training targeted specifically at Faculty of Arts students and the Arts and Social Sciences Graduate Centre coordinates training and events that are relevant and useful to research postgraduates in History.

How to apply:

Applicants must be a national of of Kenya, Mozambique, Tanzania or Madagascar.

Applicants should submit via email a single MS Word or PDF document which includes a curriculum vitae (no more than 2 pages), a brief letter (no more than 2 pages) outlining their proposed research project and qualification for the studentship, a sample of writing (c. 3,000 words) and the names and contact details of two academic referees. Please send this document to the email address risingfromthedepths@nottingham.ac.uk no later than 5pm on Thursday 20th September 2018. Please ensure the subject line of your email appears as ‘surname, first name – Faculty of Arts/Nottingham studentship.’

Informal enquiries may be directed to jon.henderson@nottingham.ac.uk

Shortlisted candidates will be asked to complete an application for PhD study in the Department of Classics and Archaeology in advance of the interview (interviews can be conducted over Skype or video conferences for those unable to attend in person):

https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/pgstudy/how-to-apply/apply-online.aspx

Fellowship opportunity: Early Career Women Scientists

The Organisation for Women in Science for the Developing World has recently launched a two year fellowship aimed at supporting women to produce research of an international standard and to initiate collaborations and partnerships with industry and the private sector. The fellowship is open to women in low and middle income countries.

More information can be found here. 

PhD Studentship, University of Roehampton

Fully-funded PhD studentship: University of Roehampton

The University of Roehampton is a partner institution of the Global Challenges Research Fund/Arts and Humanities Research Council project titled, Rising from the Depths: Utilising Marine Cultural Heritage in East Africa to Help Sustainable Social, Economic, and Cultural Benefits. In support of, and integral to, this project the University is offering 4 fully-funded (with bursaries) PhD studentships for social anthropology projects. A major condition for the scholarships is that applicants must be nationals of Kenya, Mozambique, Tanzania or Madagascar – countries which are the focus of the project.

Funding, for each of the studentships, is available for 3 years full-time study. The bursary includes tuition waver and a stipend of £16.777 per year. It is expected that the successful applicants will each contribute up to 6 hours of work, per week, over a 40 week year, to the university.

These studentships will be based at the University of Roehampton (there is no provision for distance-learning PhDs) with a period, or periods, of fieldwork in the country that is the focus of the research project.

In order to be flexible in terms of perspectives we have not set specific research projects. However, we are interested in projects that are social anthropological, based on ethnographic fieldwork, in the area of ‘maritime practices’. Such practices might include, for example, but are not limited to, those within fishing; harvesting marine and coastal resources; sailing and knowledge of the sea; boatbuilding; artisanal crafts and skills; trading; heritage conservation and reconstruction; tourism and guiding; arts focusing on the sea and the coast; maritime food cultures; health, nutrition, and well-being etc. In addition to having excellent anthropological potential, the projects should also address issues of benefits, as set out in the title of the overall project.

Applicants should have a Masters-level degree in social anthropology or in a related disciplinary area, for example sociology, human geography, environmental studies etc.

The call for applications will close on 31st August 2018 and we hope to interview short-listed candidates in early September. Successful applicants will be expected to start the PhD programme in January 2019.

Applicants are encouraged to look at the details of the project at our website:

http://risingfromthedepths.com

You may contact Professor Garry Marvin, g.marvin@roehampton.ac.uk, who will be overseeing the anthropological aspects of the project, for an informal discussion of PhD ideas.

Applications should be submitted to:

https://www.roehampton.ac.uk/graduate-school/degrees/ NB: deadline of 30 June does not apply to this studentship

PhD Studentship, Community archaeology and heritage in coastal eastern Africa, University of York

Fully-funded PhD studentship: Community archaeology and heritage in coastal eastern Africa

As part of the Global Challenges Research Fund/Arts and Humanities Research Council project titled, Rising from the Depths: Utilising Marine Cultural Heritage in East Africa to help Sustainable Social, Economic, and Cultural Benefits, the University of York is offering a fully-funded PhD studentship in community archaeology and heritage in coastal eastern Africa. The studentship is to be held in the Department of Archaeology, supervised by Dr Stephanie Wynne-Jones. The PhD research can explore any aspect of community archaeology and heritage in this region, but should contribute to the overall research agenda of the project. It should also draw on the strengths of the department at York.

Rising from the Depths seeks to explore the marine cultural heritage of eastern Africa, and to conduct challenge-led research that can stimulate ethical, inclusive and sustainable economic growth. Applicants are strongly encouraged to look at the details of the project at our website.

The studentship will cover full overseas fees, and a stipend at the standard RCUK rate (for 2018/19 this was £14,777). Applicants must be nationals of Kenya, Tanzania, Mozambique or Madagascar and research should also be focused in that area. Applicants will also need to satisfy the eligibility criteria for postgraduate research at the University of York: a Masters degree in a relevant discipline and proof of English language competence (https://www.york.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-research/apply/)

Applicants should in the first instance contact Dr Stephanie Wynne-Jones (Stephanie.wynne-jones@york.ac.uk) to discuss their proposed project. Applications will be based on a research proposal and CV, to be received by 31 August 2018. Shortlisted candidates will be interviewed by Skype/telephone during September 2018. The PhD studentship will begin from 1st January 2019, and will be part of a cohort of doctoral students funded by the project. Details of the other studentships are currently being advertised and are available on the project website.

PhD Studentship, Climate and human-related risks to coastal and maritime cultural heritage in eastern Africa – Bournemouth University

As part of the Global Challenges Research Fund/Arts and Humanities Research Council project ‘Rising from the Depths: Utilising Marine Cultural Heritage in East Africa to help Sustainable Social, Economic, and Cultural Benefits’, Bournemouth University is offering a fully-funded PhD studentship focusing on any aspect related to (a) climate and/or human-related risks to maritime/coastal cultural heritage in eastern Africa or (b) coastal management practices to reduce environmental and social vulnerabilities associated with current and future threats (climate or human-related). The studentship is to be held in the Department of Life & Environmental Sciences (Faculty of Science & Technology), supervised by Dr Luciana S. Esteves.

We are inviting applications to PhD project proposals that related to the two broad themes indicated above and select the candidate based on the quality of the proposed research and its fit to the wider scope of the ‘Rising from the Depths’ project. Rising from the Depths seeks to explore the marine/maritime cultural heritage of eastern Africa, and to conduct challenge-led research that can stimulate ethical, inclusive and sustainable economic growth. Applicants are strongly encouraged to look at the details of the project at our website.

The definition of maritime/coastal cultural heritage used within the project is broad and include tangible (such as buildings, shipwrecks, natural habitats, heritage sites) and intangible (such as traditional practices in fishing, arts, religion and other aspects related to identity of coastal communities) heritage and their relations with or dependency of the coast and/or the sea. The PhD research can explore any aspect of coastal change driven by climate and/or human activities (e.g. coastal development and port infrastructure) affecting coastal/maritime cultural heritage in eastern Africa (with particular interest in Mozambique, Tanzania, Kenya and/or Madagascar). Projects of interest may focus on quantification of risk and vulnerability, coastal management strategies, adaptation measures and other related aspects, at any spatial scale (local, national or regional), preferably, covering temporal scales that are relevant to coastal management.

While the PhD researcher will be based at Bournemouth University, there will be opportunities of internships at partner organisations (e.g. Nottingham, York, Ulster, Cambridge, Roehampton, Eduardo Mondlane), intended to enhance research capacity and skills and promote integration within the project. A total of nine PhD studentships are being offered by project partners to candidates from East Africa. The PhD students will benefit from interacting with each other and from mentorship offered by project investigators. In this sense, the project aims to influence the creation of the next generation of researchers, building research capacity related to marine cultural heritage in the region, establishing it as an interdisciplinary field of research with major social, economic and cultural significance. The specific skills developed at BU will depend on the focus of the PhD research, and may include: GIS, regional analysis of global data, shoreline change analysis, fieldwork and remote sensing techniques,  in addition to collaborative work, interdisciplinary thinking, working in multicultural teams and environments.

You can read the full advert here.

Rising from the Depths funding call is live

The Rising from the Depths Network is happy to announce that it’s first funding call for Innovative Projects is live.

The call is open to small, medium and large projects that aim to fill knowledge gaps in Marine Cultural Heritage, tackle challenge based issues and create tangible benefits in Kenya, Tanzania, Mozambique and Madagascar.

Applications are open until 12pm (UK time) on the 14th of September 2018.

You can read our full funding call here. 

Representing Africa in British Museums – Rosalie Hans

Rosalie Hans

Royal Albert Memorial Museum, Exeter, 8th June 2018

This one-day conference, organised to celebrate the newly renovated African displays at the Royal Albert Memorial Museum (RAMM), comprised of presentations by a great number of well-known curators of African collections in British museums. Organised in association with the Institute of Arab and Islamic Studies of the University of Exeter and chaired by Professor Timothy Insoll, the day started with this introduction. It highlighted some of the criticisms students have made of African galleries in museums over the past couple of years like the challenged of displaying the geography of Africa, its supposed timelessness and the debate between presenting African artefacts as art or in a more contextualised setting.

Following this critical note, speakers such as Dr Zachary Kingdon, Africa curator of the World Museum in Liverpool and Dr Sarah Worden, senior curator of African collections at the National Museums of Scotland, detailed the history of their institution’s African galleries. They showed how the representation of Africa has radically changed from the colonial and racist mind-set of the late 19th and early 20th century to a more inclusive curatorial practice that tries to reflect the origins of the collections and its difficult colonial legacies and tell more accurate stories about Africa. Still, Malik Saako Mahmud, Senior Curator at the Ghana Museums and Monuments Board pointed out that there is continuing work to do to ‘decolonise’ African collections and their displays further.

Dr Malika Kraamer, curator of World Cultures at Leicester Arts and Museums Service, Professor John Mack of the Sainsbury Research Unit and Dr Chris Wingfield, Senior Curator of the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Cambridge, focused on how research into, and reconsideration of, certain types of objects can change the way Africa is represented in exhibitions. Kraamer’s plea for a rethinking of kente cloth in museum collections and Wingfield’s research into missionary collections from Southern Africa emphasised that the agency of African people needs to be considered when looking at and displaying collections. It is a challenge faced by many curators in British museums that the information available about collections is often limited to the European collectors and does not include information about the African people that were involved in the process. Tony Eccles, curator of ethnography at the RAMM, described how approaching the redisplay in Exeter through the theme of ‘commerce’ allowed him to circumvent some of these issues by presenting artefacts as products in processes of interaction rather than as hermetic works of art. Nevertheless, Professor John Mack argued that objects formerly described as ‘fetishes’, but more accurately called nkisi, are now considered in a more contemporary artistic manner which allows for their appreciation beyond a historical relegation to the realm of ritual and magic.

By reflecting on recent temporary exhibitions related to African collections, Dr John Giblin, formerly of the British Museum and now Head of Collections at the Royal Museums of Scotland, and Stephen Welsh and Campbell Price of the Manchester Museum, opened up the discussion to the perception of Africa by visitors. Giblin shared some of the findings of the evaluation of a South Africa exhibition at the British Museum and how the British public responded to a more critical approach to the British role in South Africa’s history. Welsh and Price emphasised the museum’s work with diverse local communities and advocated for a move from a multicultural vision of the museum to a poly-vocal one, stimulating dialogue and participation from diverse audiences.

All in all, the conference enabled many fruitful conversations during the day and provided much food for thought for the future. It is clear that, apart from practical constraints, the representation of Africa in British museums is an on-going process of rethinking that needs to be reflected upon with many stakeholders, not in the least with those people whose culture and history are presented in the galleries.

Workshop at University of Dar es Salaam

On 3rd July, Stephanie Wynne-Jones and Paul Lane of the RfTD team were at the University of Dar es Salaam for a workshop discussing community heritage programmes in Tanzania. The RftD grant calls were discussed, and much valuable feedback was given by our Tanzanian colleagues. Dr Emmanuel Kessy, our regional coordinator was also present and helped structure discussions. We look forward to working with our UDSM colleagues in future as we develop RftD projects in the region.

Find out more about the CONCH project here.