Workshop “Tanzania’s Marine Heritage: A Climate Adaptation Priority”

An interdisciplinary law/archaeology workshop exploring the negative impact of climate change on Tanzania’s marine cultural heritage

About this event

This interdisciplinary workshop aims to bring together lawyers, archaeologists, environmental experts and policymakers to investigate the extent to which marine cultural heritage (MCH) should be represented as a climate adaptation priority in Tanzania’s National Adaptation Plan (NAP); and, in turn, how this representation could provide greater economic and cultural benefits for citizens by creating the potential to attract support from international funds.

Tanzania’s MCH is in danger of being lost or damaged due to climate change. Under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, Tanzania has prepared a National Adaptation Programme of Action in which it identifies MCH sites as a short-term adaptation priority, and as important to developing sustainable and climate resilient tourism as they are to the country’s enduring cultural heritage. However greater emphasis could be placed on the role that MCH can play in improving the resilience to climate change of coastal communities through sustainable tourism in this sector.

Tanzania is in the process of preparing its NAP, in which it will identify medium- to long-term comprehensive climate adaptation priorities, and this workshop explores the inclusion of MCH as a specific adaptation priority in this policy document so that, ultimately, financial support can be sought for specific projects from the UNFCCC’s financial mechanism and other sources. Greater funding could not only build local capacity to record and preserve MCH at risk of climate change, but also identify infrastructural and developmental priorities to safeguard significant MCH against climate change-related loss and damage to ensure that it becomes an important area of green economic growth for coastal communities through the development of sustainable tourism initiatives, which bolster the resilience of such communities to the negative effects of climate change.

The workshop seeks to address the following questions:

  • Should there be a greater focus on the protection of MCH in Tanzania’s NAP, and if so, what impact could such an inclusion realistically have?
  • What is the feasibility and viability of including a greater focus on MCH in Tanzania’s NAP?
  • If MCH becomes a greater focus in Tanzania’s NAP, what should this look like?
  • If feasible and viable, could a similar approach be adopted in the NAPs of other East African coastal countries?

Workshop Overview

Panel 1: Tanzania’s Marine Cultural Heritage

Panel 2: Climate Mitigation and Adaptation in Tanzania

Panel 3: Marine Cultural Heritage and Climate Change: Policies, Challenges and Opportunities

(4) Roundtable Discussion

Speakers include archaeology, heritage and climate policy experts from the University of Dar es Salaam and Sokoine University, GiZ, the National Museum of Tanzania and the Government of Tanzania.

 

The workshop takes place on 3 August 2021. You can register HERE to attend this event.

Read more about the Rising from the Depths Network project “Incorporating Marine Cultural Heritage Protection into Tanzania’s National Adaptation Plan”.

Women’s Identity, Textiles and Heritage (WITH): Coastal Style in Mozambique

June 2021

The WITH Coastal Style project, supported by the Rising from the Depths (RftD) Network is researching the role of material heritage amongst women in coastal Katembe district, across the bay from the Mozambican capital city, Maputo. The project focuses on understanding and highlighting the complex relationship between tradition and change in the lives of women in Katembe through the capulana, a cloth worn by women throughout Mozambique. Through discussion about capulana, the project provides a forum for women to discuss wider issues relating to their lives at a time of major infrastructural development around Maputo.

In March 2020 flights were booked, visa applications processed, accommodation arranged. The plan was for the National Museums Scotland (NMS) team (Sarah Worden and John Giblin) to join the team in Maputo (Co-Investigator Valda Marcos, Post Graduate Researchers Emilia Machaieie and Claudio Mondlate, and photographer Yassmin Fortes) for the installation of a temporary exhibition at the Fortress Museum in Maputo, a milestone in the delivery of the project. Just days away from travel the pandemic hit our project plans and everything was put on hold. Challenging as this was, we are delighted to report that on 28th May 2021, over thirteen months later than originally planned the exhibition opened. Sadly the NMS team were still unable to travel to be part of the installation and opening event. As curator of the host venue, Co-Investigator Moises Timba co-ordinated the content, installation and opening of the exhibition with the rest of the Mozambican team.

Invitation to the WITH Coastal Style Exhibition opening event

The Exhibition

The exhibition takes as its focus a group of women from Katembe, a coastal fishing community on the South Western side of Maputo Bay who participated in the project research. Proposed urbanization of the Katembe area following the construction of the Maputo-Katembe Bridge in 2019 is likely to impact on the material practices and living traditions of the residents of the small fishing communities in the area. Life by and on the sea, catching, selling and eating fish, is a source of community solidarity that spans generations in Katembe. Through a series of powerful photographs taken among the mothers, daughters, sisters, and friends of Katembe the visitor is introduced to the project, the women, their coastal environment and the role of the cotton printed capulana in their lives as an expression of identity and cultural heritage.

The bi-lingual text panels (Portuguese and English) outlining the research emphasise the collaborative nature of this international project. A personal quote from one of the research participants relating to the significance of the capulana introduces each section panel.

‘I use capulana because I am a Mozambican woman!’

Dona Zena, 22 years, Mahlampfane, Katembe, November 2019

‘Every woman always has to wear a capulana … capulana can be useful in various situations … be it menstruation, pregnancy, carry a baby, go to the market, go to the hospital, in case of accident … ‘

Dona Cristina, 54 years, Guachene, Katembe, November 2019

Collected during the research interviews, these responses are incisive and thought-provoking and, with the images, have been selected to generate discussion and debate concerning the role of material heritage in connecting communities.

The exhibition is ready for visitors in the gallery space of the Fortress Museum

Opening Event

Covid restrictions limited the number of invited guests at the opening event, but a range of institutions were represented, including: Eduardo Mondlane University, Director of Culture, Faculty of Art and Social Sciences, CECOMA (Communication centre of UEM), Ministry of Culture and Tourism (National Director of Heritage), UNESCO, Fisheries Museum (Project partner), and ISARC (Higher Institute of Art & Culture, Mozambique). Among the other guests were university assistants and artists based in Maputo. A welcome speech, including a message from Sarah Worden (NMS), was delivered by RftD Network Co-ordinator for Mozambique, Solange Macamo, Lecturer of Archaeology and Heritage Management in the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology (UEM).

One of the exhibition gallery spaces at the Fortress Museum

Following the opening speeches refreshments were served and a lively performance by Sekerekane, a local female dance group. The sound for the event was organized by Julio, a DJ from the School of Communication and Art (ECA) /UEM).

Exhibition opening speeches in the grounds of the Fortress Museum

A group of women from the project research group also attended the opening, with transport from Katembe organised by the Fisheries Museum. Project team members Emilia and Claudio were on hand to guide the group through the exhibition in which the women are the ‘stars’, and to record their re-actions to the displays to include in the research. Wearing their matching capulana, the design selected by the group in November 2019, as a thank-you gift to the women for their participation in the project, their presence made a powerful visual statement of the role of the capulana in group identity.

The opening event included entertainment by Sekerekane dance troupe

Project team members Moises, Claudio and Emilia with representatives of the Katembe research group

Invited guests view the exhibition displays

Emilia introduces members of the Katembe research group to the exhibition

Members of the Katembe research group, wearing matching capulanas, are among the first to visit the displays

Members of the team have participated in a number of broadcasting events to talk about the project and the exhibition including national Radio station SFM and CECOMA, a centre of communication of UEM who also interviewed others in the project team. Moises Timba also made an appearance on the popular TVM Bom Dia Mocambique programme to talk about the exhibition. Media interest has also included interviews with Yassmin by Mazanga for Radio Mozambique and for Flash radio programme.

We look forward to further project outcomes including the preparation and opening of an itinerant, touring, exhibition in Katembe where the research took place organised by the Fisheries Museum in Maputo, taking the project in a different format to schools and local communities later in the year. You can see more details of the project in the link  Rising from the Depths » Women’s Identity, Textiles and Heritage: Coastal Style in Mozambique (WITH Coastal Style)

 

 

 

Rising from the Depths brings MCH local challenges and research to the UNESCO capacity-building workshop for Africa

During the last three weeks, the Rising from the Depths Network has cooperated with UNESCO Nairobi Regional Office and the ICOMOS International Scientific Committee for the Underwater Cultural Heritage (ICUCH) in the organization of the Online Training on Underwater Cultural Heritage Protection and Management for African countries. This workshop, which has been kindly supported by the UNESCO Japanese Funds-in-Trust, has introduced participants with the basic theoretical knowledge to understand the tangible and intangible aspects of marine cultural heritage, its connections with communities, and its importance to harness sustainable social, economic, and ecological development. Furthermore, the workshop has widely presented the different tools and approaches to underwater archaeological research and integrated cultural heritage management within the framework of the UNESCO 2001 Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage.

Dr John Cooper presents the results of the innovation project “Bahari Yetu, Urithi Wetu (Our Ocean, Our Heritage)” in the framework of the UNESCO Online Training on the Research and Management of the Underwater Cultural Heritage for Africa

Rabekoto Andrinjarisoa Heritiana participates at the UNESCO Online training workshop presenting the innovation project “Study and Implementation of Network System by Fishers’ Community Actor for The Marine Cultural Heritage Survival”

Several innovation projects within the Rising from the Depths Network illustrated, with vivid case studies from the region, the different challenges and potentials of marine cultural heritage research, enhancement, and preservation. The key relation between nature and culture, and its wider connection to society and governance shown through these cases demonstrate the need for synergies, and integrated, inclusive, participatory, and interdisciplinary management approaches. The presentations from the RftD projects included in the UNESCO were recorded and are accessible here below:

Group Picture of some of the participants and trainers of the UNESCO workshop on research and management of the underwater cultural heritage for Africa

 

 

Various images from scoping meetings showing UK based researchers meeting UNESCO, NGOs, individual stakeholders, scientists and children in East Africa

RISING FROM THE DEPTHS AGENDA PUBLICATION

The network has just published our research agenda in the open access Heritage Journal. This paper outlines the aims of the Rising from the Depths and describes the co-creation of a challenge-led research and sustainability programme for the study of Marine Cultural Heritage in eastern Africa.

You can access the paper here:

Heritage | Free Full-Text | Rising from the Depths Network: A Challenge-Led Research Agenda for Marine Heritage and Sustainable Development in Eastern Africa (mdpi.com)

 

https://www.mdpi.com/2571-9408/4/3/57

Various images from scoping meetings showing UK based researchers meeting UNESCO, NGOs, individual stakeholders, scientists and children in East Africa

Scoping meetings with a wide range of academic, community and marine stakeholders including (from bottom right clockwise): academics and researchers based in the UK; UNESCO officials, NGOs and government representatives at a State Parties session in Paris; community leaders at the Ilha de Mozambique; the Bidi Wa Kasi women’s group in Mida Creek, Kenya; ocean scientists at the Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute; lawyers from the Nairobi Law School; as well as school children in Kilwa, Tanzania (centre).

UNESCO joins forces with the Rising from the Depths Network and ICOMOS-ICUCH to build capacities in Africa

Poster with image of a diver inspecting a wreck. Text says " Save the Dates 16-17, 23-24 &30 June - 1 July 2021 UNESCO Online Training Workshop for the Protection of Underwater Cultural Heritage" with logos for UNESCO ICOMOS ICHUCH and Rising from the Depths

The Rising from the Depths Network cooperates with UNESCO Nairobi Regional Office and the ICOMOS International Scientific Committee for the Underwater Cultural Heritage (ICUCH) in the organization of the Online Training on Underwater Cultural Heritage Protection and Management addressed to African countries. The workshop, which is supported by the UNESCO Japanese Funds-in-Trust, will provide the necessary basic theoretical knowledge to understand the main concepts and processes around the research, management, and protection of the maritime and underwater cultural heritage.

The workshop follows the UNESCO Foundation Course Manual on the Management and Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage, supplemented by additional theoretical and practical themes believed to be important in strengthening local capacities. Projects from the Rising from the Depths Network will present their advances and results, illustrating with clear case studies the contents delivered.

The Online Workshop will have a duration of six days, distributed over three weeks (16-17, 23-24 & 30 June – 1st July 2021). Each day will be composed of lectures and debates with the participants and observers.

The workshop is open to country-elected participants, and observers from the region. The online workshops will count on a variety of international experts, most of them recognized members of ICOMOS-ICUCH.

For more information, please address the Organizing Committee at uchworkshop2021@gmail.com and arturo.rey@ed.ac.uk.

 

Linking Rising from the Depths and the Honor Frost Foundation

The Rising from the Depths network is excited to announce the award of £178,749 funding from the Honor Frost Foundation to create two posts at the University of Edinburgh – a three-year PhD position and a two-year Post-Doctoral position. The funding bring two major marine initiatives together, the Rising from the Depths network (RftD) and the Honor Frost Foundation (HFF), to maximise the impact and reach of both.

A central aim of both RftD and HFF is to demonstrate to developers, policy-makers, NGOS and governments, the essential role that Marine Cultural Heritage (MCH) can play in ethical and sustainable coastal management and offshore development. The coastal areas of the eastern Mediterranean and eastern Africa share the same challenges: an increase in offshore development; intensified coastal infrastructural development; a background of political instability; and a lack of expertise and legal structures relating to MCH.

The PhD position will be advertised soon but we are thrilled to announce that the Post-doctoral position – the Honor Frost Scholar in Marine Cultural Heritage – has been filled by Dr Arturo Rey da Silva who starts at the University of Edinburgh this week.

Arturo-on-a-UNESCO-capacity-building-mission-in-Madagascar

Arturo running a UNESCO capacity building mission in Madagascar

Arturo is a maritime archaeologist and international cultural heritage expert who worked at UNESCO Paris as part of the Secretariat for the 2001 Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage. He recently completed a PhD at the University of Paris Panthéon-Sorbonne looking at the institutionalisation of underwater archaeology within international cooperation schemes.

Arturo post-doctoral research over the next two years will involve analyzing the outputs and outcomes of the Rising from the Depths Network projects and applying this knowledge base to the Honor Frost Foundation work in the eastern Mediterranean. As well as the preparation of policy papers from RftD activity, Arturo will use this information to help build a clear strategy for the role of marine heritage in the sustainable development of the eastern Mediterranean coastal and marine zone.

 

Honor Frost Foundation logo

 

2 Contemporary capulana with designs linked to coastal themes, purchased for the project in Maputo, July 2019

Eduardo Mondlane University – Celebration of African Heritage Day

Join academics from Eduardo Mondlane University as they discuss how arts, culture and heritage contribute to African Heritage Day. Within the presentation, the panel will be discussing several Rising from the Depths Projects, including WITH Coastal Style.

The panel will be conducted in Portuguese with English translation.

You can join the event directly through Zoom or follow this link at 9am British Summer Time or 10am Central African Time.

Meeting ID: 91285064712

Password: 169076

Call for abstracts on the role of marine and coastal heritage in climate change adaptation – deadline 9th April

We invite collaborators and members of the Rising from the Depth network to submit an abstract to the special session Secrets exposed by coastal change: Promoting the role of marine and coastal heritage in climate change adaptation strategies of the international conference ECSA 58 – EMECS 13 – Estuaries and coastal seas in the Anthropocene that will happen online live and on-demand on 6-9 September 2021.

Past and present populations have gathered along coasts and estuaries shaping the world’s marine and coastal (cultural and natural) heritage (MCH), a finite and irreplaceable resource. Rapid coastal change threatens the preservation of (known and hidden) heritage of (local to global) cultural and economic value. Research and policy developments on climate change adaptation and risk reduction are ubiquitous, but few address the sustainability of MCH, particularly in less developed countries. This session seeks to identify ways to better promote MCH into coastal management and planning and climate adaptation policies. Rather than a passive resource to be protected, how can the data and perspectives gained from considering MCH help define these strategies? We would like to invite presentations that address the opportunities or impacts created by new exposures or the loss of MCH and the related socioeconomic-cultural-environmental implications, including for the most vulnerable people.  Topics may include but are not limited to emerging frameworks, tools, methods for assessing and reducing risks/vulnerabilities to diverse MCH (e.g. landscapes, buildings, archaeological sites, traditional practices, oral histories). An open discussion at the end of the session will seek to build connections between researchers, coastal managers, planners and others interested in the sustainability of MCH worldwide.

Session Conveners:

Sandra Fatorić, Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow, Delft University of Technology

Luciana S. Esteves, Associate Professor, Bournemouth University

Jon Henderson, Associate Professor, University of Edinburgh

Bidii na kazi plot making and fencing

Caesar Bita and Elgidius Ichumbaki published in new collection on Maritime and Underwater Cultural Heritage

Caesar Bita (MUCH to Discver in Mida Creak) and Elgidius Ichumbki (The Kisima Project and Musicalizing MCH) have contributed chapters to a new book: Maritime and Underwater Cultural Heritage Management on the Historic and Arabian Trade Routes, Editors: Parthesius, Robert, Sharfman, Jonathan (Eds.)

Caesar’s chapter explores ‘The Role of the National Museum in MUCH Management and Regional Capacity Building: Current Research in Kenya.’

While Elgidius’ chapter looks at ‘Methodological Approaches to Researching Maritime and Underwater Cultural Heritage Along the Swahili Coast in Tanzania.’

The publication is a great exploration of themes around Underwater Cultural Heritage, congratulations Caesar and Elgidius!

You can buy the book here.

House of Wonders, Zanzibar

Tragedy at Zanzibar’s House of Wonders

The Rising from the Depths Team were saddened to hear of the partial collapse of the House of Wonders in Zanzibar on 25th December 2020. All of the RftD team wish to express our solidarity with colleagues at the Department of Antiquities in Zanzibar and our sadness at the tragic loss of life and injury among the conservation team.  The House of Wonders is an iconic heritage landmark of Zanzibar’s waterfront. Built in 1883, it was the palace of Barghash bin Said, the second Omani Sultan of Zanzibar. The site also housed the Museum of History and Culture in Zanzibar. As such, it was an important monument that both embodied the colonial heritage of Zanzibar, based on maritime Indian Ocean trade, and was central to the heritage infrastructure of Zanzibar town. Colleagues at UNESCO and the government of Oman are working with Zanzibar’s Department of Antiquities on the restoration of the House of Wonders, which suffered earlier collapses in 2012 and 2015.

Fishers haul a fishing ngalawa onto the beach at Bagamoyo before the tide ebbs (Image: L.K. Blue)

New theme song for Marine Cultural Heritage in East Africa

Dr. Elgidius Ichumbaki, Associate Professor in the Department of Archaeology & Heritage Studies at the University of Dar es Salaam, in collaboration with popular Tanzanian rapper Chemical, has written a ‘Bongo Flava’ song entitled ‘Bahari Yetu’ (Our Ocean) outlining the importance of Marine Cultural Heritage and its relationship to the challenges currently facing Tanzanian coastal communities.

The song is intended to raise awareness of Marine Cultural Heritage in the region in a local style (Bongo Flava is a popular East African music genre) and has been widely featured on radio and television in Tanzania as well as on social media platforms (Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and YouTube).

The song builds on two research projects funded by the Rising from the Depths network – ‘Bahari Yetu Urithi Wetu’ in Bagamoyo and ‘The Kisima Project’ on Kilwa Kisiwani – as well as the ‘Digitizing Cultural Heritage for Sustainable Preservation and Development in Tanzania’ funded by Scottish Funding Council GCRF.

It is sung in Kiswahili (with English sub-titles) and has been widely played by Swahili radio stations and televisions channels beyond Tanzania including Kenya, Uganda, Burundi, and Rwanda.

As well as Tanzania the song makes reference to the other counties included in the Rising from the Depths project (Kenya, Mozambique and Madagascar) and, as a result, has become an anthem for the aims of the network as a whole.

The ‘Musicalizing Marine Cultural Heritage in Tanzania’ team are now working on a short documentary covering the making of the song and the issues it addresses. The documentary will aim to cover a behind the scenes production of the music video but also addressing the wider themes discussed in the song.

 

Find out more:

MUSICALIZING MARINE CULTURAL HERITAGE IN TANZANIA

BAHARI YETU, URITHI WETU (OUR OCEAN, OUR HERITAGE)

THE KISIMA PROJECT: HISTORIC AND FUTURE WELL MANAGEMENT ON KILWA KISIWANI, TANZANIA 

Chemical YouTube channel

 

fishing communities in mozambique

PDRA Positions with the Rising from the Depths Network

The Rising from the Depths Network is hiring two Post-Doctoral Research Assistants to work with us in the final stages of the project.

The first role is a one year contract looking at monitoring and evaluation of the projects it is funding in East Africa. The PDRA will have specific responsibility for bringing the tools and methodologies used in the funded project together to create a coherent set of policy statements on how engagement with marine cultural heritage can enhance sustainable marine development strategies. These statements will ensure the lessons learned and successful approaches created by the network can be utilised by a range of marine stakeholders from heritage professionals and national governments to local communities and industry. This will involve working with research teams in the region to help identify and create links between the projects completed and funded to date. The candidate will also assist in running dissemination events and creating online content for the Rising from the Depths website. The full advert can be found here.

The second role is a two year contract, working alongside Rising from the Depths and the Honor Frost Foundation. From the start of the contract the researcher will work on HFF and RftD activity – helping to bring the contacts, lessons learned and outputs from the RftD network into an eastern Mediterranean setting and, in turn, building a clear strategy for the role of marine heritage in the sustainable development of the eastern Mediterranean coastal and marine zone. The PDRA will also help to organise workshops and events in the eastern Mediterranean and the UK linking the activities of the HFF and RftD and ensuring an ongoing dialogue with stakeholders in both regions. As well as identifying and consolidating the outputs and impact of the RftD funded projects, the PDRA will do the same for all funded HFF projects to help create a coherent policy statement on the overall impact of the HFF. Policy papers will be created on the essential role of Marine Cultural Heritage in sustainable coastal development; offshore infrastructural work; coastal management; climate change resilience; legislation; promoting tourism, and in creating viable income streams for local communities. The full advert can be found here.

Leovigildo Cumbe taking the first photo “snap” from the CoastSnap station in -Praia de Miami-, the east site of the island (#coastsnapilha)

Call for papers: ‘Conservation implications of social-ecological change in Africa south of the equator’ of the journal Environmental Conservation

The Environmental Conservation journal are accepting papers looking at ‘Conservation implications of social-ecological change in Africa south of the equator.’

Papers must be submitted by 1 May 2021 by the journal’s website.

Full information can be read in the call for papers

 

View of Inhambane Bay and mangrove forest

Luciana Esteves to present keynote at the Coastal Hazards in Africa 2020 Conference

Rising from the Depths Co-I, Luciana Esteves will be presenting a keynote at the Coastal Hazards in Africa 2020 Conference. The conference will be presented virtually on the 27th, 28th and 29th of October and registration is available on their website.

Lu says:

“Very pleased to have been invited to be a Keynote Speaker at the Coastal Hazards in Africa 2020 online conference. I’ll present results from the Index of Vulnerability to Coastal Change developed for East Africa. The conference will bring together researchers and managers interested in African coasts to discuss our understanding of current natural and human-induced risks and hazards and how they might change in the future due to climate change and human activities.”

Register here.

Obed demonstrates nursery making

MUCH to Discover Website Launch

Caesar Bita – MUCH to Discover in Mida Creek

MUCH to Discover in Mida Creek is a project that aims to promote community development through engagement with maritime heritage. Located in Mida Creek, in Kilifi County in Kenya, it sought to make value out of Maritime and Underwater Cultural Heritage (MUCH) by helping locals learn about its potential. By developing a number of economic generating community initiatives relating to MUCH, the project has created outstanding ‘living heritage’ activities that are generating far-reaching interest and investment among the locals. Through forest surveys in the Arabuko Sokoke forest, the project has revealed how local communities use and continue to use the natural forest and Creek for settlement and subsistence as well as maritime activities such as boat building.

Within the project, communities have been involved in maritime archaeological research and surveys; the establishment of a Mida Maritime Heritage Interpretive centre in the archaeologically significant Mida Creek; building a dhow-house and fishermen boatyard using locally traditionally available materials; as well as training in ecotourism and climate change mitigation through mangrove reforestation. Additional alternative livelihood initiatives have been developed in the creek, that will not only help local communities but also help conserve the maritime wider cultural and natural landscape.

The project has demonstrated how MUCH (Maritime and Underwater Cultural Heritage) can be used to create pathways to sustainable community development and resilience.

To begin to share their activities, the Biddi na Kazi Women’s Group at Mida Creek have worked with the Documentary Institute of East Africa to co-create an interactive website:

The website can be accessed here.

 

Conversations on COVID-19, IEL and the right to food

Professor Annamaria LaChimia participated in the conversation on COVID-19, IEL and the right to food, together with Luis Eslava (Kent Law), Clair Gammage (Bristol Law) and Michael Fakhri (Oregon Law), the newly appointed UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food. They explored the impact of COVID-19 on food security, food distribution, trade, and the right to food. they emphasized the importance of local food production and of heritage in understanding the different patterns of production and subsistence. Follow the link below to listen to the conversation:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AG-791H-60k&feature=youtu.be

Heritage on the Edge: New Approaches to African Coastal Heritage

The SAFA (Society for African Archaeologists) is coming to UK this autumn and is being hosted at St Hugh’s College, Oxford 21-24th September.

We have had a session provisionally accepted that is around the Rising from the Depths themes, with up to around 20 slots for papers:

 

Heritage on the Edge: New Approaches to African Coastal Heritage

PA-16 Mark Horton, Jon Henderson and Laura Basell

mark.horton@rau.ac.uk jon.henderson@nottingham.ac.uk l.basell@leicester.ac.uk

African countries currently have little capacity to protect or explore their rich coastal and marine heritage, yet it is under active threat from unprecedented levels of infrastructural development and the impacts of climate change. In recent years there has been a revival of interest in recording tangible and intangible material cultural heritage under threat from rapid development (e.g. UK initiatives such as the AHRC- GCRF Rising from the Depths Network and the British Museum’s Endangered Material Knowledge Programme (EMKP), plus a range of other projects). This has led to the application of a wide array of new approaches and techniques that move beyond more traditional archaeological excavations and surveys or ethnographic observations. There have also been notable efforts to move towards co-production of knowledge involving multi-national collaborators and local communities.

This session seeks contributions from coastal research projects that involve: 1) the application of innovative recording and visualization techniques; 2) the co-creation of research with local stakeholders; and 3) challenge-led research aimed at creating social, economic, and/or cultural benefits. It will critically examine: a) the opportunities for situating archaeological research within a widely connected research framework; and b) the reciprocal benefits of engaging with the wider development agenda in Africa.

 

There are a couple of SAFA rules – to submit a paper you have to be a SAFA member, and there are restrictions on the number of papers that you can be first author / discussant etc. See https://www.arch.ox.ac.uk/safa-2020

Membership details for SAFA are here (its free for African scholars)

https://safa.rice.edu/annual-membership-and-subscription-fees

THE SAFA DEADLINE IS 31TH JANUARY FOR ABSTRACTS 

Any questions about submitting a proposal please contact the session organisers below:

We look forward to hearing from you!

Jon.Henderson@nottingham.ac.uk

lb434@leicester.ac.uk

Mark.Horton@rau.ac.uk

Dr Ernesto Macaringue taking the first photo “snap” from the CoastSnap station in Tofo beach (#coastsnaptofo)

African Handbook of Climate Change Adaptation – Call for Abstracts

Final Call for Contributors: “African Handbook of Climate Change Adaptation: learning, sharing and advancing efforts to promote climate change adaptation in Africa

Editorial Board
Co- Editors: Prof. Walter Leal, Hamburg University of Applied Sciences (Germany) and Manchester Metropolitan University (UK); Prof. Nicholas Ogugu, University of Nairobi (Kenya)

The “African Handbook of Climate Change Adaptation: learning, sharing and advancing efforts to promote climate change adaptation in Africa”  is expected to be launched  at COP26 in Glasgow, Scotland. With over 100 chapters covering the whole African continent, it is expected to provide a robust and long-lasting contribution to the literature on matters related to climate change in an African context, also providing new knowledge which may be considered in support of future policy-making.

The Editorial Board are looking for contributions from  senior researchers, lecturers, representatives from well established NGOs and from enterprises working on matters related to climate change adaptation from across the African continent. In particular, we explicitly seek inputs from doctoral students at advanced stages, who have results which are mature enough to be shared. There are no restrictions on the  authorship: we welcome authors based in Africa itself, and authors based elsewhere, but working in partnership with African organisations. In line with the principles of gender integration, inputs from female researchers are especially welcome. Further details will be shared with the authors of those abstracts which have been accepted.

* Deadline for the submission of a 200 words  abstract: 30th January 2020

* Deadline for the submission of full papers: 30th May 2020

Expressions of interest, initially consisting of a 200 words abstract, should include the full contact details of the authors, may be sent to the ICCIRP Office in Hamburg using this e-mail address: ICCIRP-ClimateChangeManagement@haw-hamburg.de.

Africa is officially designated as a climate change hot stop. Indeed, it is believed that climate change is one of the major challenges African countries have to face at present. The social and economic impacts of climate change on the African continent are manifold. Apart from exarcebating poverty, they significantly impair agriculture (leading among other things to food insecurity), water security and human health, among other areas. The impacts of climate change are also known to constraint economic growth and the development prospects of many African nations.

A trend seen in the international scientific climate change debate and discourse, is the fact that the documentation and reflection of experiences and studies from Africa,  is still rather  limited, especially when compared with those  from industrialised countries. Also, African researchers- especially the new generation of professionals being trained at PhD level right now-  seldom  have the opportunity to share their research and insights with an international audience.

The “African Handbook of Climate Change Adaptation: learning, sharing and advancing efforts to promote climate change adaptation in Africa” will address the above shortcomings, by offering a platform via which African experiences on climate change adaptation may documented and promoted, both within Africa and elsewhere. The publication, which will be fully peer-reviewed by a panel of editors and reviewers, is coordinated by the International Climate Change Information and Research Programme (ICCIPR) https://www.haw-hamburg.de/en/ftz-nk/programmes/iccirp/, in partnership with a set of African organisations active in the field of climate change. The “African Handbook of Climate Change Adaptation: learning, sharing and advancing efforts to  promote climate change adaptation in Africa” will be published as part of the  “Climate Change Management Series” with Springer https://www.springer.com/series/8740  which is the world´s leading peer-reviewed book series on climate change adaptation.

Details on the next publication from the series, the “Handbook of Climate Change Resilience” with over 200 authors, can be seen at: https://www.springer.com/us/book/9783319933351.

The focus group and project team with Dr Solange Macamo (far left), Incassane

WITH Coastal Style Interviews in Katembe

Sarah Worden and Solange Macamo

Project Co-Investigator, Solange Macamo, has joined the WITH Coastal Style team during their interviews in Katembe.

Solange said: “I have joined the field work, in Katembe and I have learnt how to interview women there, for collecting  data about textiles. Women were proud to tell their life history related to textiles. There are both social and economic values associated to the textiles, as part of the marine cultural heritage,  specifically in Katembe. My role in the field was to help to translate whenever it was necessary.”

You can read the full blog on the visit here.

Measuring, weighing and selling the day’s lobster catch - J. Skinner, April 2019

Rising from the Depths Public Lecture – University of York

The Rising from the Depths Network are holding a public lecture on Monday 7 October at 6pm at the University of York, hosted by Stephanie Wynne-Jones.

The evening will include three presentations:

After the talk there will be time to speak with the project time from the Network and well as some of our Innovation Project leads.

The event will take place in room K/133 Kings Mannor at the University of York at 6pm on October 7.

For more information email Stephanie Wynne-Jones at stephanie.wynne-jones@york.ac.uk.

Rising from the Depths Call Three Launched

The third and final funding call for the Rising from the Depths Network has launched.

The call will be funding projects up to £10,000 that will disseminate the wider aims of the network (the
importance and utility of MCH in Eastern Africa) and that will enhance or create links between the
existing project portfolio.

Read the full call here.

Cyclone Idai – hunger and devastation in Mozambique

A very powerful article on the human stories behind the utter devastation caused by https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/eye-of-the-storm/

Thanks to ⁦⁩ for taking the time to listen to them. It’s not too late to donate to ⁦

Mozambique Cyclone Disaster

We are shocked to see the awful news from Mozambique, Zimbabwe and Malawi, where tropical cyclone Idai has caused widespread destruction and loss of life. While it is well known that low-lying coastal cities and towns are enormously vulnerable to sea-level rise and extreme weather events, current estimates suggest this the deadliest tropical cyclone on record to have hit southern Africa.

The cyclone made landfall at the port of Beira, Mozambique’s fourth-largest city, with officials reporting that almost every building in this city of more than 500,000 people has been damaged. Early estimates for Mozambique suggest that up to a 1,000 people may have died. With the infrastructure of the area destroyed and large areas of coastal land now underwater, the worry is that this disaster could affect hundreds of thousands, if not millions of people.

Mozambique is vulnerable to periodic flooding during the rainy season but the harrowing pictures of inland seas with houses submerged up to roof level and people stranded on them only serve to illustrate how catastrophic this event has been.

To donate to the relief effort follow the links below:

https://crisisrelief.un.org/Mozambique-flash-appeal

https://www.savethechildren.org.uk/how-you-can-help/emergencies/mozambique-cyclone

Remembering Sebastiano Tusa

A minute of silence to remember Sebastiano Tusa on Monday, 11 March at the UNESCO Ministerial meeting on Underwater Cultural Heritage in Malindi, Kenya.

Professor Tusa was on his way to the meeting to deliver the keynote speech when he was tragically killed in the Ethiopian Airlines crash at Addis Ababa on Sunday.

The maritime archaeological world is in shock. Professor Tusa was an internationally renowned scholar and a champion of underwater archaeology in Italy and around the world. He was one of the drafters of the original UNESCO 2001 Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage and in 2004 was appointed as the first Superintendent of the Sea directing the Sicilian Soprintendenza del Mare marine archaeology team. More recently he was appointed Assesore for Cultural Heritage for the Government of Sicily. He directed archaeological projects in Italy, Malta, Tunisia, Libya, Turkey, Iraq, Iran, Pakistan, Japan and Kenya and was the author of 700 archaeological publications.

He had great plans for future underwater research in Kenya.

We owe him so much. His passion and leadership will be greatly missed.

 

Free online GIS course aimed at archaeologists

The gvSIG Association has provided a free online GIS course, covering a range of topics and using an open source software (gvSIG Desktop). There is no need to register for the course, and the content can be accessed from anywhere in the world. A post will be published each week on the gvSIG blog, containing a video tutorial with exercises and access to the course data. In order to complete the online course, participants must simply complete each tutorial. The course is available in both English and Spanish. For more details, see the gvSIG blog post here: https://blog.gvsig.org/2018/12/19/free-course-gis-for-archaeologists/

PhD Studentship, Law, University of Nottingham

Three-year Faculty of Social Sciences PhD studentship

School of Law, University of Nottingham

In connection with Rising from the Depths

Applications are invited for a Faculty of Social Sciences and International Office funded International PhD studentship granted in connection to a recent GCRF/AHRC-funded research project, Rising from the Depths Network: utilising marine cultural heritage in East Africa to help develop sustainable social, economic and cultural benefits. Applicants for the studentship must be African nationals, preferably but not limited to the countries which are the focus of the project, namely Kenya, Mozambique, Tanzania or Madagascar.

The Rising from the Depths projects aims to identify ways in which marine cultural heritage can directly benefit coastal communities in Kenya, Tanzania, Mozambique and Madagascar.

The subject matter of the PhD proposal should in line with the scope, aims and objectives of Rising from the Depth project. Topics could include research relating to aid agreements, public private partnership, business sand human rights, investment law, public procurement and human rights or any aspect of the so-called Blue Economy in one or a combination of the countries which are the focus of the project – Kenya, Mozambique, Tanzania or Madagascar. Though not necessarily driven by heritage the proposed topic should demonstrate its relevance to Marine Cultural Heritage in the region and express how the research could help create wider benefits for local communities.

The studentships will be based at the University of Nottingham (there is no provision for distance-learning PhDs) with a period, or periods, of research in the proposed study location if required. This studentship is available for three years full-time study (subject to satisfactory progression each year) and will be supervised by Dr Annamaria La Chimia (Law) and another academic selected dependent on the details of the chosen proposal. It will cover international tuition fees and provide an annual maintenance grant (stipend) matching Research Innovation UK recommendation – for 2017/18 £14,777 per annum, pro rata.

Applicants should have a degree in a relevant discipline (minimum requirement 2i UG level – or international equivalent) and a masters level degree, preferably LLM with a minimum of 65% in both the taught and dissertation elements (or international equivalent) in law or a related discipline. Our English language requirements are IELTS 7.0 overall (with 6.0 for listening and speaking; 6.5 for reading and 7.0 for writing).

Applications should be submitted by 30 November 2018 and we hope to interview short-listed candidates shortly afterwards (skype and video conferencing available). Successful applicants will be expected to start the PhD programme in January 2019.

The University of Nottingham’s Graduate School’s Research Training Programme offers a broad and comprehensive range of research training courses from ‘Using Archives in Your Research’, to ‘Pathways into Publishing’. The Graduate School also runs training targeted specifically at Faculty of Social Sciences students and the Arts and Social Sciences Graduate Centre coordinates training and events that are relevant and useful to research postgraduates in law.

How to apply

Applicants must be African nationals, preferably but not necessarily from m Kenya, Mozambique, Tanzania or Madagascar.

Applicants should submit a full application – including a research proposal, two academic references, a writing sample (approximately 5,000 words) and transcripts from your previous degree(s). Additionally a curriculum vitae (no more than two pages) and a brief letter (no more than two pages) outlining qualification for the studentship will be required. Your full application and supporting documents must be received by 30 November 2018. Please note on your research proposal that you wish to be considered for the ‘Rising from the Depths’ studentship.

Informal enquiries may be directed to annamaria.lachimia@nottingham.ac.uk – candidates wishing to make an application are strongly recommended to get in touch with Annamaria before submission.

Shortlisted candidates will be interviewed (interviews can be conducted over Skype of video conference for those unable to attend in person).

Find out more about applying.

Posted on Friday 19th October 2018

Shipwrecks Index Survey – call for help from marine archaeologists

As part of the Rising from the Depths project, research at Bournemouth University is assessing how climate change, natural and human-induced hazards may affect Marine Cultural Heritage in East Africa. Within this context, shipwrecks are important resources to protect, as described by the Convention on the Protection of Underwater Cultural Heritage 2001 (UNESCO).

 

We are developing an exposure (or sensitivity) index for shipwrecks. We would be grateful if you can share your knowledge to help us better understand which factors are relevant to the conservation of shipwrecks, so we can identify suitable indicators.

 

The survey will take approximately 5 minutes to complete and can be found here. 

PhD Studentship, Ulster University

Funded PhD Opportunity Maritme Cultural Heritage and Sustainability in East Africa

This project is funded by: VCRS

Subject: Geography and Environmental Studies

Summary

As part of the Global Challenges Research Fund/Arts and Humanities Research Council project titled, Rising from the Depths: Utilising Marine Cultural Heritage in East Africa to help Sustainable Social, Economic, and Cultural Benefits, Ulster University is offering a fully-funded PhD studentship in Maritime Cultural Heritage and Sustainability in coastal eastern Africa.

The studentship is to be held in the School of Geography and Environmental Sciences. The PhD research will explore an aspect of heritage, sustainability, conflict and development in this region, but should contribute to the overall research agenda of the project. It should also draw on the strengths of the School at Ulster.

This is an international studentship for suitably qualified applicants from Kenya, Tanzania, Mozambique and Madagascar. Rising from the Depths seeks to explore the marine cultural heritage of eastern Africa, and to conduct challenge-led research that can stimulate ethical, inclusive and sustainable economic growth. Applicants are strongly encouraged to look at the details of the project at our website: https://risingfromthedepths.com

Essential Criteria

  • Upper Second Class Honours (2:1) Degree from a UK institution (or overseas award deemed equivalent via UK NARIC)
  • A comprehensive and articulate personal statement

Desirable Criteria

If the University receives a large number of applicants for the project, the following desirable criteria may be applied to shortlist applicants for interview.

  • Masters at 65%
  • Research project completion within taught Masters degree or MRES
  • Practice-based research experience and/or dissemination
  • Work experience relevant to the proposed project
  • Experience of presentation of research findings

Funding

This project is funded by: VCRS

The scholarships will cover tuition fees and a maintenance award of £14,777 per annum for three years (subject to satisfactory academic performance).

Full information can be found here.

PhD Studentship, Law, University of Nottingham

3-Year Faculty of Social Sciences PhD Studentship

School of Law, University of Nottingham

In connection with: ‘Rising from the Depths’

 

Applications are invited for a Faculty of Social Sciences and International Office funded International PhD studentship granted in connection to a recent GCRF/AHRC-funded research project, Rising from the Depths Network: utilising marine cultural heritage in East Africa to help develop sustainable social, economic and cultural benefits.  Applicants for the studentship must be nationals of Kenya, Mozambique, Tanzania or Madagascar – countries which are the focus of the project.

The Rising from the Depths projects aims to identify ways in which marine cultural heritage can directly benefit coastal communities in Kenya, Tanzania, Mozambique and Madagascar. Information about the project can be found at: https://risingfromthedepths.com

The successful candidate will be given some latitude as to the scope and approach of their doctorate, but the subject matter should be related to development in the coastal and/or maritime environment of East Africa and its impact on cultural heritage. Topics could include research relating to aid agreements, public private partnership, public procurement and human rights or any aspect of the so-called Blue Economy in one or a combination of the countries which are the focus of the project – Kenya, Mozambique, Tanzania or Madagascar. Though not necessarily driven by heritage the proposed topic should demonstrate its relevance to Marine Cultural Heritage in the region and express how the research could help create wider benefits for local communities. For a fuller definition of Marine Cultural Heritage see https://risingfromthedepths.com/marine-cultural-heritage/

The studentships will be based at the University of Nottingham (there is no provision for distance-learning PhDs) with a period, or periods, of research in the proposed study location if required. This studentship is available for 3 years full-time study (subject to satisfactory progression each year) and will be supervised by Dr Annamaria La Chimia (Law) and another academic selected dependent on the details of the chosen proposal. It will cover international tuition fees and provide an annual maintenance grant (stipend) matching Research Innovation UK recommendation – for 2017/18 £14,777 per annum, pro rata.

Applicants should have a degree in a relevant discipline (minimum requirement 2i UG level – or international equivalent) and a Master’s level degree, preferably LLM  with 65% in both the taught and dissertation elements (or international equivalent) in Law or a related discipline.  Our English language requirements are IELTS 7.0 overall (with 6.0 for Listening and Speaking; 6.5 for Reading and 7.0 for Writing).

The call for applications will close on 28th September 2018 and we hope to interview short-listed candidates shortly afterwards (skype and video conferencing available). Successful applicants will be expected to start the PhD programme in January 2019.

The University of Nottingham’s Graduate School’s Research Training Programme offers a broad and comprehensive range of research training courses from ‘Using Archives in Your Research’, to ‘Pathways into Publishing’. The Graduate School also runs training targeted specifically at Faculty of Social Sciences students and the Arts and Social Sciences Graduate Centre coordinates training and events that are relevant and useful to research postgraduates in Law.

 

How to apply:

Applicants must be a national of of Kenya, Mozambique, Tanzania or Madagascar.

Applicants should submit via email a single MS Word or PDF document which includes a curriculum vitae (no more than 2 pages), a brief letter (no more than 2 pages) outlining their proposed research project and qualification for the studentship, a sample of writing (c. 3000 words) and the names and contact details of two academic referees. Please send this document to the email address risingfromthedepths@nottingham.ac.uk no later than 5pm on Thursday 28 September 2018. Please ensure the subject line of your email appears as ‘surname, first name – Faculty of Social Sciences/Nottingham studentship.’

Informal enquiries may be directed to annamaria.lachimia@nottingham.ac.uk

Shortlisted candidates will be asked to complete an application for PhD study in the School of Law in advance of the interview (interviews can be conducted over Skype of video conference for those unable to attend in person):

https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/pgstudy/how-to-apply/apply-online.aspx

Society and the Sea Conference, Greenwich University

Society and the Sea 2018; Investinblue conference: The values of the Ocean and Coasts for Sustainable Development” organised by the Greenwich Maritime Centre and National Maritime.

6th -7th September, Old Royal Naval College, Greenwich.

This international conference will bring together industry and academia to explore the value of the ocean and coasts, key challenges being faced and opportunities for future development of the blue economy. There will be over 100 presentations, 6 stages, conference dinner on board the Cutty Sark and the launch of the new Marine Social Sciences Network.

Conference Themes and Sessions include: Maritime Infrastructure & Industry; Maritime History & Heritage; Conservation & Engagement; Small-Scale Fisheries; Blue Economy; Maritime Human Health & Wellbeing; Maritime Governance; Ocean Literacy; Making Socio-Cultural Values Count; Scuppering Invisibility; Creating Places to Belong; Art, Social Impact & Reinvention; and International Coastal Communities.

Visit the conference website for more information, the draft programme and to register:  http://www.gre.ac.uk/society-and-the-sea

PhD Studentship, University of Nottingham

3-Year Faculty of Arts and Research Board PhD Studentship, Department of Classics and Archaeology, University of Nottingham, in connection with: ‘Rising from the Depths:

Applications are invited for a Faculty of Arts funded International PhD studentship granted in connection to a recent GCRF/AHRC-funded research project, Rising from the Depths Network: utilising marine cultural heritage in East Africa to help develop sustainable social, economic and cultural benefits.  Applicants for the studentship must be nationals of Kenya, Mozambique, Tanzania or Madagascar – countries which are the focus of the project.

The Rising from the Depths project aims to identify ways in which marine cultural heritage can directly benefit coastal communities in Kenya, Tanzania, Mozambique and Madagascar. Information about the project can be found on our website.

The successful candidate will be given some latitude as to the scope and approach of their doctorate, but the subject matter should be related to coastal and/or marine archaeology in one or a combination of the countries which are the focus of the project – Kenya, Mozambique, Tanzania or Madagascar. The proposed topic should consider an aspect of Marine Cultural Heritage and express how the research could help create wider benefits for local communities. For a fuller definition or Marine Cultural Heritage see our website.

The studentships will be based at the University of Nottingham (there is no provision for distance-learning PhDs) with a period, or periods, of research in the proposed study location if required. This studentship is available for 3 years full-time study (subject to satisfactory progression each year) and will be supervised by Dr Jon Henderson (Archaeology) and another academic selected dependent on the details of the chosen proposal. It will cover overseas tuition fees and provide an annual maintenance grant (stipend) matching Research Councils UK recommendation – for 2017/18 £14,777 per annum, pro rata.

Applicants should have a degree in a relevant discipline and a Masters-level degree MA (at distinction or merit) in Archaeology or a related discipline, ideally with some research focus on marine archaeology or history. Preference will be given to applicants with a demonstrable knowledge and interest in East African coastal and/or marine archaeology.

The call for applications will close on 20th September 2018 and we hope to interview (skype and video conferencing available) short-listed candidates shortly afterwards. Successful applicants will be expected to start the PhD programme in January 2019.

The University of Nottingham’s Graduate School’s Research Training Programme offers a broad and comprehensive range of research training courses from ‘Using Archives in Your Research’, to ‘Pathways into Publishing’. The Graduate School also runs training targeted specifically at Faculty of Arts students and the Arts and Social Sciences Graduate Centre coordinates training and events that are relevant and useful to research postgraduates in History.

How to apply:

Applicants must be a national of of Kenya, Mozambique, Tanzania or Madagascar.

Applicants should submit via email a single MS Word or PDF document which includes a curriculum vitae (no more than 2 pages), a brief letter (no more than 2 pages) outlining their proposed research project and qualification for the studentship, a sample of writing (c. 3,000 words) and the names and contact details of two academic referees. Please send this document to the email address risingfromthedepths@nottingham.ac.uk no later than 5pm on Thursday 20th September 2018. Please ensure the subject line of your email appears as ‘surname, first name – Faculty of Arts/Nottingham studentship.’

Informal enquiries may be directed to jon.henderson@nottingham.ac.uk

Shortlisted candidates will be asked to complete an application for PhD study in the Department of Classics and Archaeology in advance of the interview (interviews can be conducted over Skype or video conferences for those unable to attend in person):

https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/pgstudy/how-to-apply/apply-online.aspx

Fellowship opportunity: Early Career Women Scientists

The Organisation for Women in Science for the Developing World has recently launched a two year fellowship aimed at supporting women to produce research of an international standard and to initiate collaborations and partnerships with industry and the private sector. The fellowship is open to women in low and middle income countries.

More information can be found here. 

PhD Studentship, University of Roehampton

Fully-funded PhD studentship: University of Roehampton

The University of Roehampton is a partner institution of the Global Challenges Research Fund/Arts and Humanities Research Council project titled, Rising from the Depths: Utilising Marine Cultural Heritage in East Africa to Help Sustainable Social, Economic, and Cultural Benefits. In support of, and integral to, this project the University is offering 4 fully-funded (with bursaries) PhD studentships for social anthropology projects. A major condition for the scholarships is that applicants must be nationals of Kenya, Mozambique, Tanzania or Madagascar – countries which are the focus of the project.

Funding, for each of the studentships, is available for 3 years full-time study. The bursary includes tuition waver and a stipend of £16.777 per year. It is expected that the successful applicants will each contribute up to 6 hours of work, per week, over a 40 week year, to the university.

These studentships will be based at the University of Roehampton (there is no provision for distance-learning PhDs) with a period, or periods, of fieldwork in the country that is the focus of the research project.

In order to be flexible in terms of perspectives we have not set specific research projects. However, we are interested in projects that are social anthropological, based on ethnographic fieldwork, in the area of ‘maritime practices’. Such practices might include, for example, but are not limited to, those within fishing; harvesting marine and coastal resources; sailing and knowledge of the sea; boatbuilding; artisanal crafts and skills; trading; heritage conservation and reconstruction; tourism and guiding; arts focusing on the sea and the coast; maritime food cultures; health, nutrition, and well-being etc. In addition to having excellent anthropological potential, the projects should also address issues of benefits, as set out in the title of the overall project.

Applicants should have a Masters-level degree in social anthropology or in a related disciplinary area, for example sociology, human geography, environmental studies etc.

The call for applications will close on 31st August 2018 and we hope to interview short-listed candidates in early September. Successful applicants will be expected to start the PhD programme in January 2019.

Applicants are encouraged to look at the details of the project at our website:

https://risingfromthedepths.com

You may contact Professor Garry Marvin, g.marvin@roehampton.ac.uk, who will be overseeing the anthropological aspects of the project, for an informal discussion of PhD ideas.

Applications should be submitted to:

https://www.roehampton.ac.uk/graduate-school/degrees/ NB: deadline of 30 June does not apply to this studentship

PhD Studentship, Community archaeology and heritage in coastal eastern Africa, University of York

Fully-funded PhD studentship: Community archaeology and heritage in coastal eastern Africa

As part of the Global Challenges Research Fund/Arts and Humanities Research Council project titled, Rising from the Depths: Utilising Marine Cultural Heritage in East Africa to help Sustainable Social, Economic, and Cultural Benefits, the University of York is offering a fully-funded PhD studentship in community archaeology and heritage in coastal eastern Africa. The studentship is to be held in the Department of Archaeology, supervised by Dr Stephanie Wynne-Jones. The PhD research can explore any aspect of community archaeology and heritage in this region, but should contribute to the overall research agenda of the project. It should also draw on the strengths of the department at York.

Rising from the Depths seeks to explore the marine cultural heritage of eastern Africa, and to conduct challenge-led research that can stimulate ethical, inclusive and sustainable economic growth. Applicants are strongly encouraged to look at the details of the project at our website.

The studentship will cover full overseas fees, and a stipend at the standard RCUK rate (for 2018/19 this was £14,777). Applicants must be nationals of Kenya, Tanzania, Mozambique or Madagascar and research should also be focused in that area. Applicants will also need to satisfy the eligibility criteria for postgraduate research at the University of York: a Masters degree in a relevant discipline and proof of English language competence (https://www.york.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-research/apply/)

Applicants should in the first instance contact Dr Stephanie Wynne-Jones (Stephanie.wynne-jones@york.ac.uk) to discuss their proposed project. Applications will be based on a research proposal and CV, to be received by 31 August 2018. Shortlisted candidates will be interviewed by Skype/telephone during September 2018. The PhD studentship will begin from 1st January 2019, and will be part of a cohort of doctoral students funded by the project. Details of the other studentships are currently being advertised and are available on the project website.

PhD Studentship, Climate and human-related risks to coastal and maritime cultural heritage in eastern Africa – Bournemouth University

As part of the Global Challenges Research Fund/Arts and Humanities Research Council project ‘Rising from the Depths: Utilising Marine Cultural Heritage in East Africa to help Sustainable Social, Economic, and Cultural Benefits’, Bournemouth University is offering a fully-funded PhD studentship focusing on any aspect related to (a) climate and/or human-related risks to maritime/coastal cultural heritage in eastern Africa or (b) coastal management practices to reduce environmental and social vulnerabilities associated with current and future threats (climate or human-related). The studentship is to be held in the Department of Life & Environmental Sciences (Faculty of Science & Technology), supervised by Dr Luciana S. Esteves.

We are inviting applications to PhD project proposals that related to the two broad themes indicated above and select the candidate based on the quality of the proposed research and its fit to the wider scope of the ‘Rising from the Depths’ project. Rising from the Depths seeks to explore the marine/maritime cultural heritage of eastern Africa, and to conduct challenge-led research that can stimulate ethical, inclusive and sustainable economic growth. Applicants are strongly encouraged to look at the details of the project at our website.

The definition of maritime/coastal cultural heritage used within the project is broad and include tangible (such as buildings, shipwrecks, natural habitats, heritage sites) and intangible (such as traditional practices in fishing, arts, religion and other aspects related to identity of coastal communities) heritage and their relations with or dependency of the coast and/or the sea. The PhD research can explore any aspect of coastal change driven by climate and/or human activities (e.g. coastal development and port infrastructure) affecting coastal/maritime cultural heritage in eastern Africa (with particular interest in Mozambique, Tanzania, Kenya and/or Madagascar). Projects of interest may focus on quantification of risk and vulnerability, coastal management strategies, adaptation measures and other related aspects, at any spatial scale (local, national or regional), preferably, covering temporal scales that are relevant to coastal management.

While the PhD researcher will be based at Bournemouth University, there will be opportunities of internships at partner organisations (e.g. Nottingham, York, Ulster, Cambridge, Roehampton, Eduardo Mondlane), intended to enhance research capacity and skills and promote integration within the project. A total of nine PhD studentships are being offered by project partners to candidates from East Africa. The PhD students will benefit from interacting with each other and from mentorship offered by project investigators. In this sense, the project aims to influence the creation of the next generation of researchers, building research capacity related to marine cultural heritage in the region, establishing it as an interdisciplinary field of research with major social, economic and cultural significance. The specific skills developed at BU will depend on the focus of the PhD research, and may include: GIS, regional analysis of global data, shoreline change analysis, fieldwork and remote sensing techniques,  in addition to collaborative work, interdisciplinary thinking, working in multicultural teams and environments.

You can read the full advert here.

Rising from the Depths funding call is live

The Rising from the Depths Network is happy to announce that it’s first funding call for Innovative Projects is live.

The call is open to small, medium and large projects that aim to fill knowledge gaps in Marine Cultural Heritage, tackle challenge based issues and create tangible benefits in Kenya, Tanzania, Mozambique and Madagascar.

Applications are open until 12pm (UK time) on the 14th of September 2018.

You can read our full funding call here. 

Representing Africa in British Museums – Rosalie Hans

Rosalie Hans

Royal Albert Memorial Museum, Exeter, 8th June 2018

This one-day conference, organised to celebrate the newly renovated African displays at the Royal Albert Memorial Museum (RAMM), comprised of presentations by a great number of well-known curators of African collections in British museums. Organised in association with the Institute of Arab and Islamic Studies of the University of Exeter and chaired by Professor Timothy Insoll, the day started with this introduction. It highlighted some of the criticisms students have made of African galleries in museums over the past couple of years like the challenged of displaying the geography of Africa, its supposed timelessness and the debate between presenting African artefacts as art or in a more contextualised setting.

Following this critical note, speakers such as Dr Zachary Kingdon, Africa curator of the World Museum in Liverpool and Dr Sarah Worden, senior curator of African collections at the National Museums of Scotland, detailed the history of their institution’s African galleries. They showed how the representation of Africa has radically changed from the colonial and racist mind-set of the late 19th and early 20th century to a more inclusive curatorial practice that tries to reflect the origins of the collections and its difficult colonial legacies and tell more accurate stories about Africa. Still, Malik Saako Mahmud, Senior Curator at the Ghana Museums and Monuments Board pointed out that there is continuing work to do to ‘decolonise’ African collections and their displays further.

Dr Malika Kraamer, curator of World Cultures at Leicester Arts and Museums Service, Professor John Mack of the Sainsbury Research Unit and Dr Chris Wingfield, Senior Curator of the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Cambridge, focused on how research into, and reconsideration of, certain types of objects can change the way Africa is represented in exhibitions. Kraamer’s plea for a rethinking of kente cloth in museum collections and Wingfield’s research into missionary collections from Southern Africa emphasised that the agency of African people needs to be considered when looking at and displaying collections. It is a challenge faced by many curators in British museums that the information available about collections is often limited to the European collectors and does not include information about the African people that were involved in the process. Tony Eccles, curator of ethnography at the RAMM, described how approaching the redisplay in Exeter through the theme of ‘commerce’ allowed him to circumvent some of these issues by presenting artefacts as products in processes of interaction rather than as hermetic works of art. Nevertheless, Professor John Mack argued that objects formerly described as ‘fetishes’, but more accurately called nkisi, are now considered in a more contemporary artistic manner which allows for their appreciation beyond a historical relegation to the realm of ritual and magic.

By reflecting on recent temporary exhibitions related to African collections, Dr John Giblin, formerly of the British Museum and now Head of Collections at the Royal Museums of Scotland, and Stephen Welsh and Campbell Price of the Manchester Museum, opened up the discussion to the perception of Africa by visitors. Giblin shared some of the findings of the evaluation of a South Africa exhibition at the British Museum and how the British public responded to a more critical approach to the British role in South Africa’s history. Welsh and Price emphasised the museum’s work with diverse local communities and advocated for a move from a multicultural vision of the museum to a poly-vocal one, stimulating dialogue and participation from diverse audiences.

All in all, the conference enabled many fruitful conversations during the day and provided much food for thought for the future. It is clear that, apart from practical constraints, the representation of Africa in British museums is an on-going process of rethinking that needs to be reflected upon with many stakeholders, not in the least with those people whose culture and history are presented in the galleries.

Workshop at University of Dar es Salaam

On 3rd July, Stephanie Wynne-Jones and Paul Lane of the RfTD team were at the University of Dar es Salaam for a workshop discussing community heritage programmes in Tanzania. The RftD grant calls were discussed, and much valuable feedback was given by our Tanzanian colleagues. Dr Emmanuel Kessy, our regional coordinator was also present and helped structure discussions. We look forward to working with our UDSM colleagues in future as we develop RftD projects in the region.

Find out more about the CONCH project here.

 

Rising from the Depths cited as best practice at UNESCO meeting

The Rising from the Depths project was cited as an example of best practice in sustainable marine heritage management at the Meeting of the Scientific and Technical Advisory Body on the Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage last week (23rd April 2018). Ulrike Guerin, UNESCO Programme Specialist responsible for the 2001 Convention, stated that the project could act as ‘a driver for cohesion between social, economic and environmental dimensions of sustainable development’. The exchange day meeting, held on the 23rd April at UNESCO headquarters in Paris, focused on the potential role marine cultural heritage could play in in the understanding, promotion and protection of Oceans within the forthcoming United Nations Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development (2021-2030). It was attended by representatives of the 58 state signatories to the 2001 Convention and held in collaboration with the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO (IOC-UNESCO), the body responsible for the organization of marine science within the UN system.

Dr Jon Henderson, who attended the meeting on behalf of Rising from the Depths project, said ‘The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals are setting the global agenda and, as a result, are going to be instrumental to academic research for the next 12 years. If marine cultural heritage is to progress, establish itself in modern practice, and realise its full potential, then it needs to respond to these challenges. Rising from the Depths has a key role to play in this as it is harnessing the potential of marine heritage to inform solutions to real challenges in East Africa such as rapid coastal development, climate change and unsustainable fishing practices.’

 

JOB OPENING: Rising from the Depths Project Manager

Rising from the Depths Project Manager (fixed term)

The University of Nottingham has received funding from the RC UK’s Global Challenges Research Fund which is a £1.5Bn initiative aiming to tackle global challenges in the national interest. The project ‘Rising from the Depths: Utilising Marine Cultural Heritage in East Africa to help develop sustainable social, economic and cultural benefits’ is a multi-partner interdisciplinary research project with an ambitious programme for delivery.

Rising from the Depths will identify ways in which marine cultural heritage can benefit coastal communities in Kenya, Tanzania, Mozambique and Madagascar. The project will establish and maintain a trans-boundary and cross-sector network of arts and humanities-led researchers, government officers, scientists, policy makers, UN officials, NGOs, ICT professionals and specialists working in heritage, infrastructure and the offshore industry, to identify new opportunities and methodologies for utilising the marine cultural heritage of East Africa to stimulate alternative sources of income, foster local identities, and enhance the value and impact of overseas aid in the marine sector. Information about the project can be found at: https://risingfromthedepths.com.

The University of Nottingham is leading the network and is seeking to appoint a Project Manager. The successful candidate will have previous experience of administration and project management as well as proven experience of financial planning and reporting. You will have excellent oral and written communication skills with proven experience of maintaining effective working relationships and experience of working with a diverse set of stakeholders including senior academics and funders.

In the role you will be required to manage and coordinate the programme of international network and engagement events (including booking travel and arranging all aspects of the events), support and manage the distribution of a series of project funding calls, act as a liaison point for all project members, network members and external partners, monitor and report on the project budget ensuring all expenditure is in line with University Policies, are ODA compliant and are in line with the terms and conditions of the grant. Other duties include supporting all project meetings, assisting with the production of reports and other material for dissemination as well as ensuring effective delivery of day-to-day administration for the project. The role holder will be based in the UK.

The project team will require the successful candidate to work flexibly to meet the objectives of what will be a challenging programme, requiring effective monitoring and organising people across a range of countries. You should have proven experience of prioritising changing workloads, meeting tight deadlines and setting and achieving milestones. You will have excellent IT skills and experience of using these within a project management setting.

This post will be offered on a fixed-term contract until 31st September 2021 and is a full time post. Job share arrangements may be considered.

Informal enquiries may be addressed to Dr Jon Henderson, tel: 0115-9514842 or email
Jon.henderson@nottingham.ac.uk. Please note that applications sent directly to this email address will not be accepted.

The University of Nottingham is an equal opportunities employer and welcomes applications from all sections of the community.

The closing date for completed applications is: Monday 26 March 2018

Salary: £29799 to £30688 per annum (pro-rata if applicable) depending on skills and experience.

 

For more information on the post and to apply online go here:

https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/jobs/currentvacancies/ref/ARTS030218X1

 

JOB OPENING: Rising from the Depths Post-Doc Position (Anthropology)

Rising from the Depths Post Doctoral Researcher (Anthropology)

The University of Roehampton is looking for a Postdoctoral Research Associate to join our Life Sciences department as part of an AHRC-funded research project, Rising from the Depths: Utilising Marine Cultural Heritage in East Africa to help develop sustainable social, economic and cultural benefits. Applicants should have a PhD in social anthropology, have conducted ethnographic research in Mozambique, Tanzania or Kenya, and have a good knowledge of one of the local languages. Knowledge of Swahili would be especially useful. The successful candidate will be able to develop their own research project within the remit of the project – particularly in the areas of cultural memory, indigenous understandings of the past, relationships with marine/maritime cultures. You will help with identifying potential areas of research, relating to the themes above, for 4 PhD projects that will form part of the overall project and work with other researchers in the team to explore issues relating to marine cultural heritage.

This post is available on a fixed-term basis for 12 months.

For enquiries relating to this position please contact Professor Garry Marvin, g.marvin@roehampton.ac.uk.

This is an exciting time for the University; our new £35m state-of-the art library has just opened and we are continuing to develop a number of external partnerships across the globe.

We have a strong emphasis on supporting our students to reach their full potential in order to launch themselves onto successful graduate careers and we are embarking on a radical programme of enhancement in learning and teaching across all our academic areas. ‘In the Complete University Guide 2018, Roehampton is the highest-ranked modern university in London. Modern, or new, universities are defined as those granted university status post-1992. Complete University Guide does not itself define modern universities and does not produce a separate league table in which these are ranked.’

The University has a beautiful, vibrant parkland campus, is located in the heart of south-west London and offers excellent facilities for researching, learning, teaching and working.

To find out more information about the role and what we’re looking for, visit the Working at Roehampton section of our website where you will find full details, how to apply, as well as further information about the benefits of working for us.

http://www.roehampton.ac.uk/Working-at-Roehampton/

The closing date for completed applications is: Thursday 1 March 2018

It is expected that interviews will be held on: during March 2018

The University is an equal opportunities and ‘disability confident’ employer

For more information on the post and to apply online go here:

http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/BHQ056/postdoctoral-research-associate/

 

JOB OPENING: Rising from the Depths Post-Doc Position (Heritage/Development)

Rising from the Depths Post Doctoral Researcher (Heritage/Development)

The University of Nottingham has received funding from the RC UK’s Global Challenges Research Fund which is a £1.5Bn initiative aiming to tackle global challenges in the national interest. The project ‘Rising from the Depths: Utilising Marine Cultural Heritage in East Africa to help develop sustainable social, economic and cultural benefits’ is a multi-partner interdisciplinary research project with an ambitious programme for delivery.

The Rising from the Depths Network will identify ways in which marine cultural heritage can directly benefit coastal communities in Kenya, Tanzania, Mozambique and Madagascar. The project will establish and maintain a trans-boundary and cross-sector network of arts and humanities-led researchers, government officers, scientists, policy makers, UN officials, NGOs, ICT professionals and specialists working in heritage, infrastructure and the offshore industry, to identify new opportunities and methodologies for protecting and utilising the marine cultural heritage of East Africa to stimulate alternative sources of income, foster local identities, and enhance the value and impact of overseas aid in the marine sector.

The University of Nottingham is leading the network and is seeking a PDRA with a research interests in East African cultural heritage and/or development studies. Applicants should have a PhD in a related archaeology, heritage or development field. Experience of working on research or development projects in East Africa would be an advantage. The PDRA will have specific responsibility for scoping and reporting on development and heritage methodologies that could be applicable to conducting, assessing and monitoring Arts and Humanities led research in an East African context.

The person appointed will be expected to plan and conduct work in close collaboration with the project Co-Is, PDRAs at other institutions as well as with project partners in the region.  They will be responsible for writing up their work for publication. The person appointed will be based in the Department of Classics and Archaeology at the University of Nottingham and is expected to work in close collaboration with our University project partners (Roehampton, Bournemouth, Ulster, York, Uppsala in Sweden and Eduardo Mondlane in Mozambique) and engage with organisations part of the network (including UNESCO, The World Monuments Fund, The British Museum, the British Institute in East Africa and the Western Indian Ocean Marine Science Association). The person appointed will be expected to use their initiative and creativity to identify areas for research development and extend their own research portfolio.

This is a part time position working 29 hours per week (0.8 FTE), fixed term until 1 April 2019.

Informal enquiries may be addressed to Dr Jon Henderson, tel: 0115-9514842 or email jon.henderson@nottingham.ac.uk. Please note that applications sent directly to this email address will not be accepted.

The University of Nottingham is an equal opportunities employer and welcomes applications from all sections of the community.

For more information on the post and to apply online go here:

http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/jobs/currentvacancies/ref/ARTS028318

JOB OPENING: Rising from the Depths Post-Doc Position (Geosciences/Physical Geography)

Rising from the Depths Post-Doctoral Researcher (Geosciences/Physical Geography)

The Faculty of Science & Technology, University of Bournemouth, is seeking to recruit an enthusiastic and competent researcher to contribute to the Rising from the Depths Network project.

The post offers the opportunity to join an interdisciplinary team of academic staff, post-doctoral researchers and PhD students, providing a stimulating and challenging opportunity to develop research with social impact in East Africa. The person appointed will be based in the Department of Life & Environmental Sciences at Bournemouth University and is expected to work in close collaboration with project partners (Nottingham, Roehampton, Ulster, York, Uppsala in Sweden and Eduardo Mondlane in Mozambique) and engage with organisations part of the network.

Ideally, you will have a PhD in a subjected related to geosciences or physical geography or demonstrate clear evidence of research experience at a commensurate level. You will have experience in analysing quantitative and qualitative data to quantify/assess environmental changes in coastal and/or marine settings. A track record of publications in journals is essential. You will need to be self-motivated and a team player with good written and oral communication skills.

The successful candidate will have specific responsibility for scoping and reporting on anthropogenic and climate-driven environmental changes and coastal management practices affecting risks and preservation of marine cultural heritage in East Africa. The key objective of the work will be to collate and analyse data to identify areas where coastal and marine cultural heritage are at greater risk from human-induced and climate-driven environmental change. The PDRA will contribute strongly to the project by creatively applying relevant research techniques and methods to develop the research agenda and be actively engaged in collaborative work, in writing new research proposals and disseminating the work through publications and presentations.

This post is available on a fixed-term basis for 12 months; the post is part-time 0.8 FTE.

For informal discussions contact Dr Luciana S. Esteves, lesteves@bournemouth.ac.uk, tel. +44 (0)1202 962446.

Apply here:

https://www1.bournemouth.ac.uk/post-doctoral-researcher-fixed-term-part-time

 

First Museum of Archaeology opens in Mozambique

The first ever Museum of Archaeology in Mozambique was opened at Eduardo Mondlane University in Maputo on the 19th December 2017. The museum is affiliated with the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FLCS) and managed by the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology. It is the first to chart the prehistory and history of Mozambique from early humans up until the modern era. As well as archaeological exhibits there is lecture space and galleries for sculpture, painting and photography exhibits.

Read more about the inauguration of this important new museum here:

http://www.uem.mz/index.php/noticias-recentes/954-uem-inaugura-museu-de-arqueologia

http://africatimes.com/2017/12/22/mozambique-university-opens-new-archaeology-museum/

UNESCO and Italian underwater archaeologists meet in Kenya

Safeguarding underwater cultural heritage for sustainable development in Kenya

UNESCO joined forces with the Italian Cultural Institute in Kenya to participate in a two-day lecture series and film presentation entitled “Italian Archeologists: Between Desert and Sea”, which took place 10 and 11November 2017 at the Michael Joseph Centre in Nairobi, Kenya.

For more details of the meeting click here or below:

http://www.unesco.org/new/en/nairobi/about-this-office/single-view/news/safeguarding_underwater_cultural_heritage_for_sustainable_de/

For further information on Italian underwater archaeologists working with Kenyan archaeologists click here or below:

http://www.iicnairobi.esteri.it/iic_nairobi/it/

African Archaeology Research Day 2017

The 2017 African Archaeology Research Day (AARD) meeting, which will be hosted on Saturday 25 November at the Department of Archaeology, University of York.

The African Archaeology Research Day has been an annual event in the UK since 2002 and the first meeting held at the University of Oxford. The meetings are informal and are aimed at encouraging both undergraduate and postgraduate students, as well as established academics, to present their research. They include plenty of time for informal discussion. Since 2002, the conference has been led by various academics in the field, at different venues across the country. Last year’s event at the Institute of Arab and Islamic Studies, University of Exeter, was extremely successful at showcasing the range of research being undertaken on Africa’s past.

Stephanie Wyne-Jones, a member of the organising committee, will present a paper on the Rising from the Depths project at the meeting.

More information on the meeting can be found on the project website here.

Coastal management

Sustainable ecosystem-based management of estuaries and coasts

If you are an early career researcher based in the UK or South Africa and interested in sustainable ecosystem-based management of estuaries and coasts, watch this space as in February we’ll be selecting 30 participants for a South Africa-UK Researcher Links Workshop taking place in Durban on 19-21 June 2018.

Workshop coordinators and mentors include: Lu Esteves (Bournemouth University); Trevor Hill (Univ Kwazulu-Natal); Bronwyn Goble (Oceanographic Research Institute); Louis Cellier (CSIR); Mike Elliot and Katie Smyth (University of Hull) and Andrew Cooper (University of Ulster).

Venue: Oceanographic Research Institute – uShaka Marine World, Durban, South Africa

fishing communities in mozambique

Grant Success

Major AHRC-GCRF grant success for Rising from the Depths project

The Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) have just announced five major new interdisciplinary networks that will be based at universities across the UK using more than £9m from the Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF).

The 5 networks will run from October 2017 for up to 4 years, and will showcase the distinctive contribution that arts and humanities research can bring to development in low and middle income countries.

The Rising from the Depths Network has won £2 million for a 4 year project (2017-21) which aims to help East African communities better understand and benefit from marine cultural heritage.

(more…)